bombus jonellus
In 2016, Oisín worked in conjunction with the National Biodiversity Data Centre to develop a plant monitoring scheme for Ireland. There is a form known from the Outer Hebrides where the normally white tail is bright orange, making it look very much like B. pratorum. This species nests in a variety of situations, including roof-spaces; old birds' nests (usually in holes); moss and leaf-litter on the surface of the soil and underground in old mouse or vole nests. Males are similar, but with more yellow; the yellow collar continues on the ventral side, the two first terga are always yellow, and much more yellow fur is found on the face. The garden bumblebee is slightly larger than B. jonellus, but there is an easier way to tell them apart, but it does involve looking at their faces. ©Bees Wasps & Ants Recording Society 2020. In northern and upland areas nests are not founded until June, with males in late August and September. […], Copyright © 2020 | BioWeb.ie | Web Design by Karl McCarren. A widespread, relatively small species, very similar to the generally larger Garden bumblebee (Bombus hortorum). Hylaeus signatus male emerging from roost. Females (queens and workers) have a predominantly black abdomen with a yellow collar, the first and sometimes second terga yellow, and a white tail. [1], A fairly small bumblebee, it has body lengths around 16 mm (0.63 in) (queen) and 12 mm (0.47 in) (worker and male). Oisín Duffy is an ecologist and environmental educator with a special interest in the Flora of Ireland and Pollinators. These queens may either enter hibernation or found new nests in June. In Asia, it reaches the Gulf of Anadyr on the Pacific. This bee is not regarded as being scarce or threatened. In Europe, it is considered as Least Concern (Rasmont et al. However, darker forms of the females are seen, as well as forms (sometimes considered subspecies) that differ in the amount of yellow in the fur, and with brownish hairs on the white tail. [5], The heath humble-bee is found in gardens and meadows, as well as on heath and moorland. This week we’ll be looking at a highly distinctive and beautiful species of bumblebee. The nest is small, usually with fewer than 50 workers. In southern Europe, the distribution, too, is patchy, and restricted to the mountains. [3] The queen has an average wingspan of 29 mm (1.1 in). [2] In United Kingdom, it is common in the south-east, in East Anglia, northern Scotland including the Hebrides, Orkney, and Shetland. It is widespread and often common in Europe; middle and northern latitudes of Asia, eastwards to Kamchatka (Løken, 1973). Among these are B. j. hebridensis (which is endemic to the Hebridean islands of Scotland),[4] B. j. monapiae, and B. j. vogtii. During the Summer of 2016, he toured Ireland giving workshops for the Irish Butterfly Monitoring Scheme. The males of B. jonellus are beautiful little creatures (again along with all male bumblebees they do not have the ability to sting you). Bombus jonellus (Kirby, 1802) Palearctic species, that occurs from the Pyrenees and the Cantabrian Range, to the Barents Sea coast, from Iceland in the west to Kamchatka in the east. These queens may either enter hibernation or found new nests in June. — Education at the zoo, European Crocodile Networking Meeting (ECNM) 2017. B. jonellus has a stubbed “heart shaped” face, while the garden bumblebee has a long “horse shaped” face. As I’ve mentioned above the tail of this species is white, so we then go and look at the number of bands on the body and there are three in total all of which are yellow. [6], "Less common species of bumblebee found in the UK", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bombus_jonellus&oldid=825734882, Taxa named by William Kirby (entomologist), Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 15 February 2018, at 02:50. B. jonellus is a rather attractive bumblebee and once again has the characteristic “black and yellow” colouring that we associate with bumblebees. Although it has always been considered strongly associated with heathland and moorland, it does occur in a wide variety of other habitats, although it is usually less frequent in these. When the climate permits, as in southern England, this species can have two broods a season. An Bombus jonellus in nahilalakip ha genus nga Bombus, ngan familia nga Apidae. The Pyrenean population consists of … A rather small yellow, black and white-banded bumblebee which is either expanding into habitats it was not previously found in, or has been overlooked in these areas in the past. Find out what the world looks like to them. Click on the group name to expand or contract the list. The face and proboscis are short. If you enjoy posts and especially images of plants and pollinators, then be sure to follow me on twitter also. The cuckoo bumblebee Bombus sylvestris attacks nests of this species. These nests produce their sexuals in late August or September. [5], The nest, which at most can contain 50 to 120 workers, can be situated both above and under ground. Your email address will not be published. The heath humble-bee or small heath bumblebee, Bombus jonellus, is a species of bumblebee, widely distributed in Europe and northern Asia, as well as northern North America. But for, Plant Crime: Mini-Ecosystems Under Threat, The 9th World Congress of Herpetology 9: A Review, Early Bumblebee (Bombus pratorum) — ID Guide, White-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus lucorum) — ID Guide, Not just for the pretty animals! An easy way to remember this is that the scientific name for the garden bumblebee is (Bombus hortorum), so “HOR” for Hortorum and Horse shaped. The species is smaller than the buff and white-tailed bumblebees, in fact it is probably the smallest white tailed “true bumblebee” you will see in your garden or when you’re rambling over some beautiful heath or bogland areas in Ireland. Oisín is an active biological recorder, and current Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland (BSBI) Vice-county recorder for East Donegal (H34) and participates in a number of recording schemes run by the National Biodiversity Data Centre (NBDC), Bat Conservation Ireland (BCI) and others. When photos appear you can click on them to enlarge them. Continuing with bumblebee identification, this week I’ll be writing about the Heath Bumblebee (Bombus jonellus). The face is black, occasionally with a patch of yellow fur on the top. As the name suggest this bumblebee can be found around upland areas of bog and heath but it is also found in a wide variety of other habitat (parklands, roadsides, flower rich meadows) and is a common species throughout Ireland, it is even a regular visitor to garden type habitats. Our animal friends can help open our eyes to the possibilities beyond what we see. The human eye is pretty amazing, but there are also plenty of things we can’t see. This species is distributed widely throughout the entire area covered by this Atlas, although it is apparently fairly scarce in eastern England. These nests produce their sexuals in late August or September. [5], B. jonellus is present in most of Europe and a large part of northern Asia. Visits are made to a very wide variety of flowers, both for pollen and nectar. An Bombus jonellus in uska species han Apidae nga syahan ginhulagway ni Kirby hadton 1802. He has a BA from NUIG and an MSc from NUIG and UL. An easy way to remember this is that the scientific name for the garden bumblebee is (Bombus hortorum), so “HOR” for Hortorum and Horse shaped. On the Orkney and the Hebrides, a form exists where the males have red tails instead of white. In southern lowland areas B. jonellus is often bivoltine, with first-generation queens searching for nest sites in March, and males and new females are produced in May. The heath humble-bee or small heath bumblebee, Bombus jonellus, is a species of bumblebee, widely distributed in Europe and northern Asia,[2] as well as northern North America. Notify me of follow-up comments by email. 2015). The red-tailed bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius) is, Dr Stephanie King and Dr Vincent Janik from the University of St Andrews’ Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU), have made, With a new series of Planet Earth generating a lot of excitement, Spring, Autumn and Winterwatch on the BBC and, Since my early childhood, I have found frogs fascinating. It is found beyond the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia and Russia, where it is continuous north of 55ºN, more uneven south of it. This fascination with frogs has only increased in life the more, Vikings, bicycles and sugary pastries are things that usually come to mind when we think of the Danes. Keys and general biology are found in Sladen (1912), Free & Butler (1959), Alford (1975) and Prŷs-Jones & Corbet (1991). [3] The bumblebee visits various food sources, such as clover, bird's-foot trefoil, cowberry, thistles, and many others. It is useful to have that comparison for the first few times, but it is generally very easy to tell them difference in a stubby face and a horsey face. Despite the English name it is not restricted to heathland (although it does show a preference) and can be found in a wide range of habitats. Whilst it undoubtedly does very well on heathlands and moorlands and may be very frequent here, it is also found in calcareous grasslands, such as Salisbury Plain, coastal dunes and suburban gardens. A study in northern Sweden shows the males, when patrolling for young queens, do so at tree-top level, marking twigs and leaves with pheromones to attract the queens. The males are similar to the workers and queen except they have yellow tufts of hair on the face (the bumblebee beard) which gives an even more yellow appearance to the species. Clicking on other group will close opened group automatically. Workers may therefore be found between April and September in southern and lowland areas, but only between July and September in northern or upland areas. In southern lowland areas B. jonellus is often bivoltine, with first-generation queens searching for nest sites in March, and males and new females are produced in May. In the west, it is common from Iceland in the north to the Cantabrian Mountains in northern Spain. His most recent work has been as a photographer and author of the “Wildflowers in South Armagh”. Two of these yellow bands are on the thorax and one is on the abdomen. However it is not all plain sailing, there is another species which also has a white tail, two bands on the thorax and one on the abdomen and its name is the Garden Bumblebee (Bombus hortorum) which I’ll be talking more about next week.

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